Marcus Borg Quotes

Eight Quotes by: Marcus Borg of Anglican Association of Biblical Scholars President of AABS.

Note: Quotes are shown in reverse date order. Undated quotes are listed last.

I affirm, along with many others, that the major enduring religions of the world are all valid and legitimate. I see them as the responses to the experience of God in the various cultures in which each originated. To be Christian means to find the decisive revelation of God in Jesus. To be Muslim means to find the decisive revelation of God in the Koran.
Source here on the Internet. Dated: 6th April 2009.
See also Is this scriptural?

The titles of Jesus (son of God, messiah, light of the world, etc.) are not found in the earliest layer of tradition and are not part of self proclamation of Jesus. This does not make them wrong. Rather, they are the voice of the community, statements about what people around Jesus thought of him.
Source here on the Internet. Dated: 26th January 2011.
See also Is this scriptural?

To be Christian means to find the decisive revelation of God in Jesus. To be Muslim means to find the decisive revelation of God in the Koran. To be Jewish means to find the decisive revelation of God in the Torah, and so forth.
Source here on the Internet. Dated: 26th January 2011.
See also Is this scriptural?

The stories of Jesus’ birth in Matthew and Luke provide a second illustration of the truth of metaphor. Like the Genesis stories of creation, they have been a source of conflict among Christians. Some Christians insist that they are and must be seen as factual narratives:…[but] emphasizing the historical factuality of the stories distract from their meaning… When this happens, the rich, more-than-literal meanings are most often lost.
Book: by Marcus Borg entitled: The Heart of Christianity [New York: Harper Collins, 2003] , p 52 Published: 2003.
See also Is this scriptural?

I let go of the notion that the Bible is a divine product. I learned that it is a human cultural product, the product of two ancient communities, biblical Israel and early Christianity. As such, it contained their understandings and affirmations, not statements coming directly or somewhat directly from God. . . . I realized that whatever "divine revelation" and the "inspiration of the Bible" meant (if they meant anything), they did not mean that the Bible was a divine product with divine authority.
Book: by Marcus Borg entitled: The God We Never Knew p25 Published: 6th May 1998.
See also Is this scriptural?

Seminary also introduced me to the historical study of Jesus and Christian origins. I learned from my professors and the readings they assigned that Jesus almost certainly was not born of a virgin, did not think of himself as the Son of God, and did not see his purpose as dying for the sins of the world ... I also found the claim that Jesus and Christianity were the only way of salvation to be troublesome.
Book: by Marcus Borg entitled: The God We Never Knew p25 Published: 1997.
See also Is this scriptural?

The image I have sketched views Jesus differently: rather than being the exclusive revelation of God, he is one of many mediators of the sacred.
Book: by Marcus Borg entitled: Meeting Jesus again for the First Time, p. 37. Published: 1994.
See also Is this scriptural?

I would argue that the truth of Easter does not depend on whether there was an empty tomb, or whether anything happened to the body of Jesus. ... I do not see the Christian tradition as exclusively true, or the Bible as the unique and infallible revelation of God. ... It makes no historical sense to say, ‘Jesus was killed for the sins of the world.’ ... I am one of those Christians who does not believe in the virgin birth, nor in the star of Bethlehem, nor in the journeys of the wisemen, nor in the shepherds coming to the manger, as facts of history.
Jesus Seminar, Bible Review, December 1992. Dated: 1992
See also Is this scriptural?

Home page Index of Articles